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Ginny Thrasher

Winning a gold medal in air rifle takes more than just standing and pulling a trigger. Much, much more. West Virginia University sophomore Ginny Thrasher — who captured a slice of national glory by shooting her way to the first gold medal awarded at the 2016 Summer Olympics — explains how shooting sports is part-art, part-science, part-brain, part-brawn.

“One of the greatest things about the rifle is the juxtaposition between physical and mental,” said Thrasher, who’s studying biomedical engineering. “People look at us and think all we do is don’t move, but there is a lot more to it than that.”

Here, Thrasher fires away at the mechanics of her sport.

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