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Each of these photos tell you what happens because of West Virginia University. In the darkest hours of the night. In the brilliance of dawn. At home. And abroad. Stay tuned as we add new photos.
Kadeisha Buchanan, Ashley Lawrence and Ginny Thrasher. 

You saw them at the 2016 Rio Summer Olympics, and Mountaineers got a chance to welcome our medalists home. Sophomore Ginny Thrasher (right) took home the gold medal for the U.S. in the women’s 10m air rifle, and women’s soccer seniors Kadeisha Buchanan (left) and Ashley Lawrence (center) won bronze medals as part of the Canadian team in the 2-1 final against Brazil. All three appeared at the halftime of the WVU vs. Missouri football home game. (Photo by M.G. Ellis)

Forensic students

It’s around midnight when white suits appear cloaked in darkness splashed with blue flashes from police car beacons and lamp light. Taylor Koepfler, David Lennon and Honors student Ashli Reed (l-r) were among 22 West Virginia University seniors collecting evidence as part of a mock night crime scene in teaching assistant professor Robert O’Brien’s Crime Scene II class. On Nov. 4 at WVU’s crime scene training complex, the largest in the world, students took photos, collected fingerprints and created a reconstruction in the lifelike aftermath of a staged shooting scene. The WVU Department of Forensic and Investigative Science is the only forensic science program in the nation that offers BS, MS and PhD degrees. (Photo by Nicholas Morales)

Collecting water samples

When an estimated 10,000 gallons of coal-washing chemicals leaked into the Elk River, near Charleston, W.Va., in 2014, the University quickly sent teams to collect water samples, at first in the river, and then in the municipal water system. The spill left residents without access to city water for months as the chemical that smelled like licorice lingered in water tanks and pipelines. WVU scientists testified before the legislature and worked to develop research on a chemical that wasn't well understood. (Photo by Raymond Thompson Jr.)

Student walking in a field

Hannah Clipp goes into the wilds at dawn to track waterfowls in the Pleasant Creek Wildlife Management Area in West Virginia. The senior from Bel Air, Md., once got separated from her parents at the National Zoo as a child — she was admiring ducks swimming in a fountain. At WVU she became the first student to earn both the Udall and Goldwater national scholarships because of her work in the environment and science. (Photo by Raymond Thompson Jr.)



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Each of these photos tell you what happens because of West Virginia University. In the darkest hours of the night. In the brilliance of dawn. At home. And abroad. Stay tuned as we add new photos.

Continue Reading